Going Green in India

In Animals, Development, Environment, Life in India by Vijay Jayaraj0 Comments

Going Green in India 1For people in the 21st century, the phrase ‘going green’ could mean different things—saving trees, keeping the environment clean, and more recently reducing carbon dioxide emissions for unsubstantiated reasons that are part of the global warming/climate change/climate disruption movement.

But I decided to go green literally and visit the dense forest regions in southern India over the weekend, and get my own stewardship perspective on that area’s environment.

India is known for some very specific things—Bollywood,  food, crowded cities, poverty, and lack of hygiene.

But India has more to it. The country has 515 wildlife sanctuaries and 103 national parks (both of which come under The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources IUCN category II protected areas). My visit was to the Mudumalai national park and wildlife sanctuary.

Click here for more on wildlife sanctuaries in India.

3.Waterways that provide drinking water to many of the towns surrounding the sanctuary.

Waterways that provide drinking water to many of the towns surrounding the sanctuary.

Open wilderness offering tranquility and respite from the mad rush of the cities.

Open wilderness offering tranquility and respite from the mad rush of the cities.

Pathways reserved for elephants. Usually littered with elephant dung.

Pathways reserved for elephants. Usually littered with elephant dung.

 

 

Tea estates.

Tea estates.

Vijay Jayaraj (M.S., Environmental Science) is the Research Associate for Developing Countries for the Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation. He currently lives in Udumalpet, India.

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